Ask Audrey Ask Audrey
Archived

Robots Vs Art

Robots have taken control in order to prevent Earth’s destruction. Now one of them has written a play.

Text size
Text size
Company: GradCo Studio
Add to favourites

Robots Vs Art

Date: 18 Aug 2019

Robots have taken control in order to prevent Earth’s destruction.

Humankind has been all but eradicated, save for a few thousands who toil in the mines. Cities have returned to a wild state. Animals roam the streets. Carparks are forests once again.

Everything is running precisely according to plan. Sustainability has been achieved and the planet’s future secured. Were robots able to feel smug, they might. Yet one of them, Executive Master Bot, has inklings there is something more to existence than ensuring the flawless distribution of zinc.

In his downtime, he writes a play for robots to perform but he needs input from someone who knows what it is to experience emotion. He needs a human director. The only one left is Giles, currently being worked to death in a mine.

Executive Master Bot makes Giles an offer he can’t refuse: if the play is a success, Giles will be allowed to live and perhaps breed. Failure will result in Giles’s death and the extermination of the rest of his species. No pressure then.

Written by Travis Cotton, Robots Vs Art is a clever left-field comedy generating laughs from his witty combining of familiar sci-fi tropes, theatre industry in-jokes and the culture clash familiar to anyone who has had to explain their art practice to an accountant.

It raises nagging questions, too: What is the function of art? How does one calculate its value and its cost? Is art synonymous with irrationality and are the impulses driving us to create really so far removed from those compelling us to destroy?

Gradco Studio presents this new production for the Sydney Fringe Festival, directed by Sean Foster and featuring Aimee Lodge, Cassius Russel, Heaven-Cheyenne Campbell and Natanyah Forbes.

“My vision for the play is to make it feel epic and cinematic,” says Foster. “A majority of the theatre I see tends to not make as much use of music as films do. This play allows us to get away with that, because it wants us to suspend our disbelief a little bit more than normal. I hope audiences will walk away thinking that this play is hilarious, but then not be able to sleep because they’re afraid of their smart watch.”

Content
Gritty in Pink
Add to favourites
ArchivedThe Emerging Artist Sharehouse, Erskineville, Sydney 3 - 7 Sep 2019

Gritty in Pink

Is pink a powerful way to reclaim femininity? Is pink a marketing tool? Or something else entirely?

Matriarch
Add to favourites
ArchivedOld 505 Theatre, Newtown, Sydney 3 - 7 Sep 2019

Matriarch

2019 Green Room Award Winning performer Sandy Greenwood brings Matriarch to Sydney for the first time.

LOVE+
Add to favourites
ArchivedOld 505 Theatre, Newtown, Sydney 3 - 7 Sep 2019

LOVE+

From Ireland's MALAPROP Theatre, a one-woman two-hander about the inevitability of human-robot relationships.

See More

More to see

View All
Minky Opens a Gallery
Add to favourites
ArchivedChippen St Theatre, Chippendale, Sydney 4 - 7 Sep 2019

Minky Opens a Gallery

Joanna Weinberg's new comedy propels its audiences into the glitzy and sordid world of the art market.

Sorry to Cut You Off, Penny
Add to favourites
ArchivedPACT Centre for Emerging Artists, Erskineville, Sydney 4 - 7 Sep 2019

Sorry to Cut You Off, Penny

An election night dinner party turns into a punchy and deeply personal journey, as four young women confront a nation and make their voices heard.

Sydney Fringe Festival 2019
Add to favourites
ArchivedVenues across Sydney 1 - 30 Sep 2019

Sydney Fringe Festival 2019

Sydney Fringe celebrates its 10th anniversary this year an eye-popping program of performance, music, theatre, comedy, visual art, film, dance and circus.

We are the (End of the) World
Add to favourites
ArchivedNew Theatre, Newtown, Sydney 9 - 14 Sep 2019

We are the (End of the) World

An original musical comedy pokes fun at contemporary Australia’s incessant need to be seen as selfless.

Top