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Daisy Moon Was Born This Way

Growing pains

Daisy Moon and her brother Noah dream big but they’re both stuck in a world that's too small. 

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Company: Q Theatre
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Daisy Moon Was Born This Way

Date: 9 Nov 2017

Bright eyed and eccentric 14-year-old Daisy Moon (played by Isabelle Ford) is President and Founder of the Little Monsters Club for Misfits.

She chairs club meetings inside the dusty beachside bus stop on her front lawn. She’s the club’s only member.

Her 18-year-old brother Noah, an elite athlete on the cusp of cracking national competitions, couldn’t be more different – until he’s caught trying to cheat in a time trial.

Written by Emily Sheehan, produced by Q Theatre and directed by Nick Atkins, Daisy Moon Was Born This Way is a comic, kooky coming of age story about making mistakes and learning to love yourself anyway.

“The characters are young people, but this is a play for adult audiences,” Sheehan says. “I’m in my 20s and I think I’m writing for an audience close to myself. You’ve got to make the work that you want to see on stage, the work that you love, the stories that move you.”

Sheehan says she’s “a sucker for a sad story, but the way to achieve that is to shine so much bright light through it. If you want to go sad, you’ve got to fill it with joy and laughter. So the result of that in Daisy Moon Was Born This Way is a really dark, but very funny story about some really oddball characters who are just trying so hard to do their best.”

In the play, Daisy is dealing with her mother’s depression, at the same time she’s falling in love for the first time in her life. She’s also reunited with her brother who’s been living away from home. She also has a close imaginary friend in Lady Gaga.

“There’s a lot of magic and delight in the world of the play,” Sheehan says. “We’re really leaning into that hyper-feminine, hyper-performative exploration of identity and coming of age story which has been so much fun to play with in the rehearsal room.”

One of the major themes explored in Daisy Moon is the pressure to be a success in the eyes of the world. “I’m exploring the idea of feeling good enough. It’s a play about making some really epic mistakes, and the first time you make some of the worst choices of your life, and not having the tools to deal with the consequences. Because you get the tools by going through these moments. I think the characters are learning how to make mistakes and still be ok with themselves.”

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